loathe / loath

loathe / loath
   Loathe is a verb meaning "to detest or dislike greatly": Janice loathes animal cruelty.
   Loath is an adjective meaning "reluctant, unwilling": Lance was loath to ask for an extension on his term paper that semester.

Confused words. 2014.

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  • loathe / loath —    Loathe is a verb meaning to detest or dislike greatly : Janice loathes animal cruelty.    Loath is an adjective meaning reluctant, unwilling : Lance was loath to ask for an extension on his term paper that semester …   Confused words

  • loath — [ləʊθ] (also loth) adjective reluctant; unwilling: I was loath to leave. Origin OE lāth hostile , of Gmc origin. Usage Do not confuse loath and loathe. Loath is an adjective meaning ‘reluctant or unwilling’, as in I was loath to leave, whereas… …   English new terms dictionary

  • loath´er — loathe «lohth», transitive verb, loathed, loath|ing. to hate very much; feel strong dislike and disgust for; abhor: »We loathe rotten food or a nasty smell. I loathe cockroaches. He knew the model boy very well though and loathed him (Mark Twain) …   Useful english dictionary

  • loath, loathe — Loath is an adjective meaning reluctant, unwilling, averse, disinclined : I am always loath to admit my mistakes. Loathe is a verb meaning to detest, to abhor, to abominate, to feel disgust for : Most people loathe the rude jangling of an alarm… …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • loath — meaning ‘averse, reluctant’, as in loath to comment, is spelt loath, not loth, and is pronounced lohth (like both). It should be distinguished from the verb loathe meaning ‘to hate’, which is pronounced lohdh. The adjective loathsome, meaning… …   Modern English usage

  • loathe — (v.) O.E. laðian to hate, to be disgusted with, from lað hostile (see LOATH (Cf. loath)). Cognate with O.S. lethon, O.N. leiða. Related: Loathed; LOATHING (Cf. loathing) …   Etymology dictionary

  • loathe — ► VERB ▪ feel hatred or disgust for. DERIVATIVES loather noun. ORIGIN Old English, related to LOATH(Cf. ↑loath) …   English terms dictionary

  • Loathe — (l[=o][th]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Loathed} (l[=o][th]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Loathing}.] [AS. l[=a][eth]ian to hate. See {Loath}.] 1. To feel extreme disgust at, or aversion for. [1913 Webster] Loathing the honeyed cakes, I Ionged for bread. Cowley …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • loathe — [ləuð US louð] v [T not in progressive] [: Old English; Origin: lathian, from lath; LOATH] to hate someone or something very much = ↑detest ▪ He loathes their politics. loathe doing sth ▪ I absolutely loathe shopping …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • loathe — [lōth] vt. loathed, loathing [ME lothen < OE lathian, to be hateful < base of lath: see LOATH] to feel intense dislike, disgust, or hatred for; abhor; detest SYN. HATE loather n …   English World dictionary

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